The Difference Between the Field Museum and the Museum of Science and Industry || Sci Fi Junkies


There are two famous museums found in the windy city of Chicago, these are The Field Museum and the Museum of Science and Industry. Both of these sought-after attractions can give visitors an unforgettable Chicago experience. Though these museums share a certain amount of similarities, you should expect totally different cultural and learning exhibits. Here’s a look at some points of differentiation that set the two museums apart:

What’s in the Field Museum?

• The Field Museum flaunts “Sue” to the whole world — the largest, most complete and best preserved Tyrannosaurus fossil ever found. It is a prized permanent feature that only the Field Museum has. But bones and fossils are not the only highlights at the Field Museum. There’s also a showcase of Earth’s most famous gems, and an exhibit on ancient Egypt fit for a Pharaoh, among many others.

• Children and adults can learn along side each other as they discover the intriguing and educational exhibits on display. Furthermore, The Field Museum’s staff of researchers is constantly conducting basic studies to stay on the cutting edge of their specific scientific fields, and to keep the didactic capabilities of the museum relevant.

What’s in the Museum of Science and Industry?

• On the other hand, the Museum of Science and Industry has a different set of exhibits. It is home to an amazing coal mine replica, a captured World War II submarine, a 3500-square foot railroad with a Pioneer Zephyr (a diesel-electric powered passenger train) and don’t forget, the Apollo 8 spacecraft.

• The Museum of Science and Industry has over 2,000 exhibits. Its vast collections and attractions include the new You! exhibit where visitors are given the chance to interact with a 13 foot tall 3D heart and Science Storms where they can experience the look and feel of the natural phenomena of our world.

As you can see, there is a big difference in what you can see in the The Field Museum and the Museum of Science and Industry. One features a journey around lives and cultures of the past; the other houses the things these cultures made out of their lives. Both however, possess one great thing in common despite the vast difference — both are home to History.


Source by Laura Bowman

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